Dental Dangers: What Happens When You Don’t Care For Your Pet’s Teeth?

Preventative dental care at the veterinarian office can help you save money by reducing the risk of some serious health issues. Read more about how on our AZPAWS.org blog

 

When it comes to pet healthcare, it’s important to spay and neuter your pets. But it’s just as important that your pets receive regular dental care.

By keeping up with cat and dog dental care both at home and at the vet clinic, you can help your furry friends live a longer, healthier, and happier life. What’s more, preventative dental care at the veterinarian office can also help you save money by reducing the risk of some serious health issues.

 

Dental Dangers: What Happens When You Don’t Care For Your Pet’s Teeth?

You’ve most likely heard about the dangers of periodontal disease in humans. As it turns out, periodontal disease is even more common in dogs and cats. By the age of three, up to 80% of dogs and 70% of cats will develop periodontal disease.

 

Periodontal disease can contribute to liver disease, heart disease, and kidney disease in your pets because the bacteria from your pet’s teeth can infect your pet’s blood. Periodontal disease starts when tartar is formed above and below the gum line.

 

Some of the most common signs of potential dental issues with your pet include:

Discolored teeth

Extra teeth

Bad breath

Broken teeth

Loose teeth

Swelling around the mouth

Pain around or in the mouth (your pet may refuse to eat)

Blood around the mouth

Abnormal chewing or drooling

Changes in eating behavior

 

How Do I Treat My Pet’s Gum Disease?

It’s important to consult with your veterinarian if you notice problems with your pet’s dental care. Your vet will perform a dental cleaning and conduct x-rays to learn how severe the damage is. Your vet will then talk to you about your pet’s dental care options.

 

The earlier your pet’s dental care is taken care of the better. Only your vet can treat the tartar below your pet’s gum line, but you can reach up to 90% of your pet’s teeth just by brushing at home.

 

You’ll want to make sure you’re brushing your pet’s teeth regularly. Between two to three times a week can help to reduce your pet’s risk of periodontal disease.

 

It’s important to spay and neuter your pet, but it’s also critical to keep their teeth as healthy as possible. For more information about Pheonix dog dental care or the importance of spaying or neutering your pet, contact AZPaws today.