Category Archives: Spay

Why Should You Neuter Your Dog?

Neutering your dog can be a good decision. Read more about why on our AZPAWS.org website.

Why Should You Neuter Your Dog?

Owning a dog is a big responsibility, and as a dog owner, you have a certain duty to keep your pet healthy. Treats should only make up 10% of your pet’s daily calories, and you should be aware that 66% of all dog food allergies are caused by beef, dairy, and wheat. By age three, 80% of dogs have periodontal disease. There’s a lot to keep in mind, but one of the biggest responsibilities of a pet owner is getting their pet spayed or neutered.
For most dog-owners, neutering your pet is a part of the normal procedure of owning a pet. But why is this so? Many dog-owners out there — even if they don’t intend to breed their dogs — decide to let their pets forgo this surgery. However, there’s good reason why this has become an accepted part of dog-ownership. Check out these reasons why neutering a dog is the right thing to do:

 

Reduction of Aggression

Male dogs tend to be aggressive and confrontational to strangers and other dogs. Neutering significantly reduces this aggression.

 

Lower Licensing Fees

In most communities and counties, if your dog is neutered, the fees for licensing are lower.

 

Focus Attention

Anyone who has an un-neutered dog knows how hard it is to get them to focus their attention on an activity, especially when there are other dogs around. They will be much more interested in constantly marking their territory and investigating other dogs and people, sometimes aggressively.

 

Reduces the Risk of Prostate Disorders

Prostate disorders like enlarged prostates, prostate cysts, and prostate infections occur quite often in un-neutered dogs, but studies have shown that dogs who get neutered have a much lower likelihood of having such disorders.

 

Prevention from Breeding

Yes, puppies are amazing and adorable — but the world has more than enough of them. Hundreds of puppies are homeless and awaiting adoption at shelters all the time. Plus, the responsibility of raising the pups will most likely fall on the owner of the female.
Definitely consider the pros and the cons of neutering your dog, and get the procedure done at a safe pet neuter clinic where the professionals take pet healthcare, and neutering a dog seriously. The same goes for spaying a dog at a good spay clinic.

What to Expect When you Are Spaying or Neutering your Pet

Having to spay or neuter your pet can be an annoying process but knowing what to expect helps. Visit our website at AZpaws.org for more information.

Caring for your pet is a 24/7 task, and you’d likely do anything to improve your pet’s quality of life. The importance of spaying or neutering your pet is well-documented, and you should strongly consider visiting a pet neuter clinic if you have not yet done so.

Before you visit a pet neuter clinic, you should do some research of your own so you know what to expect. While your local spay and neuter clinic will handle the actual procedure, there are a few things you’ll need to do before the surgery to prepare your pet. Additionally, you’ll have some duties after the surgery to make sure your pet stays healthy and happy.

Your pet spay clinic will provide you with all of this information before your appointment, but it never hurts to be prepared. Here’s what you can expect before and after visiting a pet neuter clinic:

>> Pre-operation. You’ll need to schedule an appointment for a spaying or neutering, so be sure to do so at least one month in advance. Before you visit your pet neuter clinic, make sure your dog or cat has already gone to the bathroom. Also, bring all of your pet’s vaccination records to the appointment and notify the clinic if your pet has been feeling ill.

>> Post-operation. There will be a seven to 10 day recovery period following the procedure in which your pet should limit all physical activity. Make sure they stay clean, dry, and comfortable throughout this recovery period. Prevent licking, keep them well-nourished, and remain vigilant for any abnormal behavior from your pet.

>> Other pet neuter clinic services. Besides spaying and neutering, one of the most important vet clinic services is dental care for dogs. By the age of three, about 80% of dogs and 70% of cats will develop gum disease. This is largely due to poor dieting and brushing habits on behalf of the owner. As a general rule, treats should make up no more than 10% of your pet’s daily calories. Additionally, your pet should have their mouth thoroughly examined by a vet at least once a year.

Your pet deserves to be as healthy as possible, and the only way to make this happen is by seeking treatment from an experienced vet. Contact Azpaw.org to schedule your dog or cat’s appointment today.

 

 

Expensive to Spay or Neuter your Pets, Think Again!

It’s Always More Expensive NOT To Spay and Neuter Your Pets

For decades, beloved American broadcaster Bob Barker reminded Americans daily to always spay and neuter their pets. Bob Barker may be gone from the airwaves, but that message is just as important as ever. Veterinarians know that every year millions of cats and dogs of all ages are sent to kill shelters and euthanized, or worse, suffer and starve as strays. Usually, these unwanted companions are the result of unplanned pregnancies that would have been prevented with spaying and neutering.

Think You Can’t Afford a Visit To Our Phoenix Spay and Neuter Clinic? Think Again…
Fortunately, in 2015, most pet owners understand that it’s crucial to spay and neuter, thanks in no small part to the advocacy of people like Bob Barker. Still, many people assume that they can’t afford the cost of veterinary procedures, and put off a visit to an affordable spay and neuter clinic like ours. But whether they realize it or not, dogs and cats often live second lives at night, wandering far and wide and coming into contact with strange pets, or worse, feral strays.

Here in Arizona, many pet owners don’t realize that there is an affordable pet clinic offering cheap spay and neuter procedures. Even if you think the cost of an affordable spay and neuter clinic is beyond your means, remember that the cost of caring for an unexpected litter of puppies or kittens will be much, much higher. That means a quick visit to our Phoenix spay and neuter clinic can benefit you and your pets in a number of surprising ways.
The Benefits of Neutering Your Pet and Responsible Pet Ownership

If you’re on the fence about scheduling an appointment, then remind yourself that spaying and neutering your pet can save you money and heartache in the future. Spaying a dog or cat helps prevent uterine infections and breast cancer, conditions that are fatal in 50% of dogs and 90% of cats. Plus, neutering young pups can prevent testicular cancer. These simple procedures not only prevent unplanned litters, they also lead to better behaved pets less likely to run away from home. Incredibly, these life-saving veterinary visits extend pet lives by years, while also making dogs less likely to be hit by cars.

Don’t put off or delay these crucial operations because you’re afraid you can’t afford them. In the long run, our Phoenix spay and neuter clinic could save you more than the expenses of pet healthcare down the road; it could save you from the heartache that comes from a sick dog or cat.

Spaying and Neutering Your Pets: What To Expect

Spaying and neutering your pets is important. If you don’t plan on breeding, you can actually lengthen your pets life. Visit our website at azpaws.org for more information.

If you’re looking into the services at a spay and neuter clinic, you probably already know that there are many benefits of spaying your pet or neutering your pet.

This sterilization process is actually likely to lengthen your pet’s life — and keep them healthier for those extra years, too (usually one to three years for dogs, and three to five years for cats). According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), a spayed female dog has a dramatically reduced risk of uterine infections and breast cancer, which are often fatal, and neutering a dog (before six months of age) eliminates the risk of testicular cancer. Most towns and cities offer a reduced licensing fee for spayed and neutered pets, which definitely helps out your wallet (and gives you a few extra bucks to spend on a new toy for Fluffy). Most importantly, you’ll help lower the population of stray dogs and cats that are abused, neglected, and euthanized.

But let’s be honest here, most pet owners are a bit nervous before the procedure — and that’s completely normal. The best way to keep your pet healthy and safe is to prepare yourself and know exactly what to expect from an affordable pet clinic that also serves as a dog spay and neuter clinic, so with that in mind, here are a few things you should know:

  • First (and most importantly), both spay and neuter procedures are pain-free. Your pet will be under general anesthesia the whole time, just like humans receive for a surgery. The anesthesia is measured out precisely according to your pet’s size. Pain medication helps with the post-operative discomfort

 

  • For female cats and dogs, a small incision will be made in the abdominal wall to remove the uterus and ovaries; for male cats and dogs, only the testicles are removed.

 

  • The procedure won’t take too long but many clinics prefer to keep pets for a few hours, just to monitor the animal’s recovery. After your pet is discharged, it’s important to keep him or her away from other animals and allow for a recovery period for the anesthesia to wear off and the wound to heal more.

 

  • Pain medication will be provided for you to administer at home after the procedure, but many animals do just fine without it (or only need one or two small doses).

 

  • It’s normal to see slight redness and/or swelling right after the procedure; this goes away quickly.

 

  • Most pets can return to their daily activities within a week, although they may have to wear The Cone of Shame during the recovery time in order to keep them from licking or biting the incision.

The most important thing to know is that spaying and neutering your pet is good, and you’re giving your furry friend the healthiest and happiest life possible when you do so.

The 3 Rookie Mistakes That New Pet Owners Can’t Afford to Make

Bringing a new pet home for the first time can be one of the most exciting feelings, especially if you’ve never been a pet owner before. There’s a reason why we have such a close bond with our animals.
However, the old saying that pets are a big responsibility isn’t just a cliche. As the primary caretaker of your four-legged friend, it’s up to you to make sure your pet lives a long, healthy life.
Many first-time pet owners make rookie mistakes when caring for their pets — but sometimes, these mistakes can cause serious harm to your pet’s health and happiness. Be a better pet owner by avoiding these three common mistakes that new pet owners are prone to making:
Ignoring unusual behavior
When your pet is acting abnormally, it shouldn’t be interpreted as something that will go away in a few days. As a responsible pet owner, you should be aware of your pet’s unique rhythms and behaviors. If you notice behavior that seems out of character for your pet, it’s time to bring your pet to a veterinary professional.
Encouraging bad habits early
It can be tempting to let your pet get away with misbehaving — they are adorable, after all! But once you find that these bad habits are hard to break, they might not be as adorable as they initially seemed. Because of this, it’s best to avoid encouraging them; don’t feed your pet scraps from the table or let him or her sleep in your bed unless you’re prepared to deal with doing this forever.
Avoiding spay and neuter procedures
It’s something we all ask: why spay and neuter your pets? The answer is that bringing your pet into the modern spay neuter clinic shouldn’t be optional — spaying and neutering keeps your pet healthier and better-behaved, and helps cut down on the number of unwanted animals euthanized in shelters every year.

Why Summer is the Right Time to Spay and Neuter Your Pets

It’s not just the mercury in your thermostat that rises during the hottest months of the year. In fact, summer is prime season for dogs and cats to have new litters of puppies and kittens. That’s why veterinarians and spay and neuter professionals across the country are advising pet owners on the importance of spaying and neutering your pet this season.

Still not exactly sure why you should spay and neuter your pets this summer? Here’s a look at the top three reasons to invest in this highly-important procedure before the end of the season:

Spaying and neutering prevents unwanted litters of puppies and kittens.

As stated before, summertime is the top season for unaltered dogs and cats to reproduce. During this time of year, animal shelters become overwhelmed with litters of puppies and kittens whose owners simply couldn’t care for them; as a result, millions of these animals are euthanized. The number of stray animals spikes as well. While the idea of your pet having babies might seem cute for a time, it’s much more ethical to have him or her spayed or neutered.

Spaying and neutering makes your pet more obedient.

Another reason why you should spay and neuter your pets? This procedure makes pets more obedient and better-behaved. Pets who are spayed or neutered are less likely to wander away from home. When an astounding 85% of dogs who are hit by cars are unaltered, the procedure could actually save your pet’s life, as well.

Spaying and neutering keeps your pet living longer.

Spaying and neutering, which removes the animal’s reproductive organs, is the only 100% effective way to prevent certain cancers and infections. Spaying, for example, prevents uterine infections and breast cancer, the latter of which is fatal for 50% of female dogs and 90% of female cats. As a result, you’ll be able to ensure a happier, healthier life for your pet.

The Benefits of Spaying and Neutering Your Pets

Pets enrich the lives of people everywhere, adding joy and companionship to their owners’ lives. While many people strive to give their pets the highest level of care available, they often concentrate on feeding good foods, regular grooming, and taking pets to obedience class. Unfortunately, while veterinary care is a priority for pet owners, the importance of spaying and neutering your pet can be lost on many pet owners. There are many reasons why you should spay and neuter your pets for their health, and your sanity as an owner.

The most obvious benefits of neutering your pets include the decrease in pet overpopulation. This is an especially significant issue for cats, which are less likely to be adopted from shelters and harm the environment when left to roam freely. Because the number of stray and unwanted animals in communities decreases when pets are spayed or neutered, fewer animals are left in shelters or euthanized.

When you neuter or spay your cat or dog, you are sure to save money in long-term vet bills. Intact male cats and dogs are more likely to wander away from home, and are at a higher risk for testicular cancer than male pets who have been neutered before six months of age. When you neuter or spay your cat, his or her life span is increased by three to five years, while fixed dogs see a life span increase of one to three years. Many owners are concerned about the cost of having their pets fixed, but there are many dog and cat spay and neuter clinics that offer affordable surgery for low-income pet owners.

Spayed and neutered pets contribute to a more peaceful household. Spayed and neutered pets tend to be friendlier, more focused, and easier to train than their intact counterparts. Fixed pets also exhibit fewer aggressive behaviors, as well as refrain from unwanted actions like wailing and spraying.

Whether you are a cat person or a dog person, it is your responsibility as a pet owner to keep your companions happy and healthy, so be sure to have your pets spayed and neutered as early as possible to help them live a long and happy life.

Three Surprising Numbers and Statistics You Didn’t Know About Pet Overpopulation

Millions of Americans count companion animals as a member of their families. The ASPCA estimates that Americans own approximately 70 to 80 million dogs and 74 to 96 million cats.

And while there’s no denying the companionship and unconditional love you can get by owning a dog or cat, it’s also important to make sure you’re providing the best level of care to your companion animal.

Every pet owner has a responsibility to make sure his or her pet is spayed or neutered — a surgical procedure involving the removal of a pet’s reproductive organs so they can’t have puppies or kittens. One of the biggest reasons why you should spay and neuter your pets? It cuts down on the problem of pet overpopulation.

Pet overpopulation is one of the most overlooked issues plaguing the U.S. today — and it’s just one of the many reasons why you should spay and neuter your pets. Here are three numbers and statistics that show just how pervasive the problem of pet overpopulation has become:

10%

Did you know that only 10% of the stray animals that enter animal shelters are spayed or neutered? In contrast, 83% of pet dogs and 91% of pet cats are spayed or neutered on average. To help keep the number of animals in shelters down, the percentage of pets that are spayed and neutered should be closer to 100%.

70 million

It’s nearly impossible to measure the exact number of stray cats and dogs living in the U.S. Estimates for just the number of stray cats ranges around 70 million — and this doesn’t even count the number of stray dogs. The saddest part? A huge portion of these strays and unwanted animals came as a result of unplanned litters that could have easily been prevented through spay and neuter procedures.

2.7 million

Every year, approximately 2.7 million adoptable cats and dogs living in animal shelters are euthanized. This figure shows perhaps the biggest reason why you should spay and neuter your pets — it lowers the number of unwanted animals who ultimately end up suffering and being put down in shelters each year. Many dog and cat spay and neuter clinics offer reduced fees for the spay and neuter procedure, so there’s no reason not to have your pet spayed or neutered.

Three Facts That Show Why Spaying and Neutering Really Matters

Springtime is here — and spring might just be the best time of the year to take advantage of the benefits of spaying or neutering your pet.

That’s because spring is peak breeding season for pets — and by choosing to neuter or spay your cat or dog now, before peak season begins, you can more easily find an affordable spay and neuter clinic near you to perform this procedure on your furry friend.

But why spay and neuter your pets? Why does it matter? Here are the top three problems that spay and neuter procedures help reduce and prevent:

Pet overpopulation

Each year, millions of cats and dogs are unable to find a home and end up in animal shelters or out on the streets as strays — or worse, they’re euthanized. The vast majority of these pets are the products of unplanned litters of puppies and kittens. The best and most effective way to help reduce the number of unwanted pets is to have your own pets spayed or neutered.

Behavioral issues

Having your dog or cat spayed or neutered — especially once they’re 3 months old or so — also prevents a number of bothersome behavioral problems from emerging. Neutered male dogs and cats are much less likely to roam away from home and can help diminish aggressive behaviors. Spayed female pets won’t go into heat, which means they will also be better-behaved.

Pet cancers and health conditions

If performed before the pet reaches six months of age, spaying and neutering completely eliminates the risk of your pet getting certain reproductive cancers. Testicular cancer, uterine infections and breast cancer are all preventable with a spay or neuter procedure. This in turn results in a longer, healthier and happier life for your pet!

Want to know more about the importance of spaying and neutering your pet — or are you having trouble finding an affordable spay and neuter clinic? Ask us any questions you may have about this by emailing us. 

Debunking the Top Myths Surrounding Spaying and Neutering Pets

For a shocking number of pet owners, the true importance of spaying and neutering your pets isn’t often understood. As a result, 20% of dogs and 10% of cats in the U.S. today haven’t been spayed or neutered — and 98% of the country’s stray animal population is neither spayed nor neutered.

That’s because many people aren’t as educated on the benefits of spay and neuter procedures as they should be. Instead of learning about why you should spay and neuter your pets, it’s easier for many of us to go off of myths and inaccuracies we’ve heard from others — something that no responsible pet owner should do.

To help demonstrate the reasons why you should spay and neuter your pets, we’ve compiled this list of the top five most pervasive spay and neuter myths — and have provided the truth that lies behind these myths:

Myth: Having my pet spayed or neutered is too expensive.

Fact: Believe it or not, but it’s easier than ever to find an affordable spay and neuter clinic in your area. Many communities throughout the country offer reduced licensing fees and a multitude of other benefits to pet owners who have their companion animals spayed or neutered. And just remember — the cost of having your pet spayed or neutered will always be much, much less than the cost of caring for an entire litter of puppies or kittens.

Myth: Having my pet spayed or neutered will change his or her behavior.

Fact: This myth is actually true, to an extent. While spaying or neutering won’t do anything to change your pet’s actual personality, your pet will be less likely to roam away from home, decreases aggressive tendencies. A number of other undesirable behaviors will be eliminated after your pet is spayed or neutered.

Myth: Animals become less active and overweight as a result of spaying or neutering.

Fact: As any animal matures, it is necessary for owners to adjust dietary intake to compensate for more sedentary lifestyles. Animals become overweight only when they are fed too much and not exercised properly.

Myth: Behavior is adversely affected by sterilization.

Fact: The only changes in dog and cat behavior after spaying or neutering are positive changes. Male cats tend to reduce territorial spraying, depending on their age at neutering. Neutered dogs and cats fight less, resulting in fewer bite and scratch wounds and lessening the spread of contagious diseases. Male dogs and cats tend to stay home more after neutering because they no longer wander in search of a mate.

Myth: Spaying and neutering is painful to my dog or cat.

Fact: Surgical sterilization is performed under general anesthesia by a doctor of veterinary medicine. The procedure itself is not felt by the patient. There may be mild discomfort after the surgery, but most animals return to normal activity within 24 to 72 hours. The minimal discomfort experienced by dogs and cats that are spayed or neutered can be lessened with post-operative pain medications and is well worth the endless suffering that is prevented by eliminating homeless puppies and kittens.